Resources for Tom

https://childdevelopmentinfo.com/learning/learning_disabilities/teacher/#.WgCPAq2ZNok
Today I visited this website and found it very helpful for tips and tricks to help my teaching with Tom. Below will be a few of their tips I think will be helpful with Tom.

Alternate physical and mental activities: I believe this will be a very affective tool to use with Tom because he struggles to keep still throughout a lesson. I think that this will allow him to change his train of thought and re focus himself. Brain breaks will be something I will look into for my class.

Get in a habit of pausing 10 to 16 seconds before answering:I think this is very important to do within the classroom. I need to work on this more because I do not always pause when answering a question. By giving Tom that extra time to think might allow him to contribute to the conversation.

Do not confront lying by making children admit they have been untruthful:I found this one very interesting because I have previous been taught to discuss lying/ fibbing with students when it does come up. I will be looking into this tip further because Tom has a habit of lying and or putting words into peoples’ mouths.

Overall this resource I think will be very helpful in my journey teaching Tom. I am enjoying my time learning beside Tom and look forward to trying this tips and tricks with him in my next practicum.

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6 thoughts on “Resources for Tom

  1. I think that these tips will be helpful for all the students in your class, not just Tom! I’ve been trying to work on pausing and waiting before calling on students to answer my questions in lessons so that more students have an opportunity to process their thoughts and contribute to the conversation. As far as brain/body breaks go, I find that I even need them as a university student!

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  2. Jessica, Thanks for sharing these tips! I also need to remember that pausing for a bit longer before answering gives students more time to think and then come up with the courage to share their thouhts! Sometimes I am too quick and don’t give my students enough time. I also think that getting students to pair share if there are no hands up, so that they can generate ideas which they feel comfortable sharing 🙂

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  3. Thanks for the great website/tips Jessica!! I think I could use some of these with a couple of students from my classroom. Pausing before responding is something that would be so effective I think! It’s something that I also think I should work on, as i’m used to answering questions quickly sometimes during a busy classroom day! I believe it would really benefit these particular students, and allow for them to become more engaged during our class discussions.
    One thing I learned to do with primary students, and you could even adapt it for older grades as well, is if you are asking them a question, say something like “once you’ve thought of a response, put your finger on your nose” or something like that. Then pause for awhile to allow students to think about the question, as they all process at different paces. This gives everyone a chance to think, and it doesn’t automatically discourage students once they see a few hands shoot up in response right away.
    I’m curious to know if you’ve tried any of these tips with Tom yet? How did they go?

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    1. That is a great idea I think for not only Tom but for all students in general! Unfortunately I did not try that with Tom before he left however I would love to try it with my class now because some of my learners like to think about their answers! Thanks for the tip!

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  4. Thanks for the resources and tips Jess! I also have students with ADHD in my class and have found many of these strategies very beneficial. I especially like taking brain breaks and doing something physical after students have been doing a lot of mental work. I find this helps my students with ADHD alot!

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